Sweeping down from Sydney to Mornington Peninsular N.S.W.

Everything we’d read about the drive south from Sydney along the coastal route was true. The scenery is breathtaking! Although we’d enjoyed our stay in Sydney it was good to escape from the city. If only our roads at home were as quiet as this. Plenty of places to pull in off The Princes Highway and admire the view although we knew we had a fair few miles to cover and a couple of places to visit en route.

Sea Cliff Bridge, New South Wales
You can’t help but admire this feat of engineering – Sea Cliff Bridge.

Illawarra Fly is famous for its treetop walk and zipline adventure through the tree tops. Maybe it was because the views weren’t great as it was quite misty that we were underwhelmed by our visit there. Perhaps if we’d done the zipline we would have been more impressed? So it was on to the next tourist spot, Fitzroy Falls.

Part of the tree top walk taken from one of the lookout towers at Illawara Fly NSW.
Part of the tree top walk taken from one of the lookout towers at Illawara Fly.

Fitzroy Falls is actually the name of the village which was founded in the early 19th century. Today according to Wikipedia 218 people live there. You’ll see from the plaque below that the good old Europeans began moving the indigenous Aboriginal people out from the area in 1816. This was a very spiritual place for the Aborigines, a fact lost to those early settlers.

We enjoyed our walk through the forest and especially the views which were spectacular including the falls where the water plunges down over 80 metres. The Visitor Centre acknowledges the Aboriginal history of the region and sells locally made souvenirs. We both felt that this tourist attraction was well worth the visit.

After a short drive we arrived at Vincentia, Jervis Bay for our overnight stay. After booking into our hotel for the night, Dolphin Shores we drove into town for a beer. Fabulous evening with a golden light lighting up the Bay; it was so good sitting out on the pub veranda, that I had a second pint.

Fitzroy Falls NSW and views.
Fitzroy Falls in Morton National Park and other natural features.

Very excited about our trip today. You just have to see kangaroos if you’re visiting Australia and today was going to be the day! We were heading for Pebbly Beach. If you take a look at their website you’ll see there’s kangaroos everywhere on the beach.

First of all we drove down through this wonderful, primeval forest which is part of Murramarang National Park. Definitely something out of Jurassic Park, it even smelt ‘earthy’. Arriving at the car park we started “roo” spotting. Was that a kangaroo over there? Maybe not. The weather was fantastic as we walked to the beach. Definitely very scenic with pure white sand and secluded but where were the residents? In fairness I don’t suppose they’re on the beach all the time and it was very hot but we’d come a long way …

We sat for quite a while soaking up the sun until we felt we’d had enough. We walked slowly back to the car feeling a bit miffed but just before we got there, on the grass by the bushes were a group of kangaroos. Turned out it was our lucky day in more ways than one as we hadn’t realised you had to pay for parking until we spotted the machine. No traffic violation …this time …but that’s a story for another Blog.

Kangaroos at Pebbly Beach N.S.W.
Elusive kangaroos at Pebbly Beach.
Views of Pebbly Beach NSW
Scenic and secluded Pebbly Beach

We stayed at a place called Eden that night. Not a lot happening there on a Monday evening. We drove round looking for somewhere to have dinner without success and arrived back at our hotel. Apparently there are around 3000 or so people who live in this coastal town, they certainly don’t go far on a Monday night!

Thankfully the next place we stayed in had a lot more life even though it’s a small village. Metung is very pretty and sits by the shores of Gippsland Lakes. I loved our wooden house at McMillans of Metung and had an enjoyable swim in the pool there. We’d definitely recommend this resort and the friendly people who own it. Another place we loved was the flower and tea shop where we had the biggest, squidgiest chocolate cake ever, it was divine! Thanks you Effloresce Flowers and Cafe, the walk into town along the boardwalk by the lake in the late afternoon sun was lovely and to discover they were still open was an added bonus.

Next morning we headed off to the wonderfully sounding name, Walhalla, which was an old mining town established in 1862. In its day the Gold Mine was one of the richest in Australia and the town was booming. Not like that today but it’s history is fascinating and of course it now relies on the tourists although at the time our visit it was fairly quiet. The town nestles in a deep mountain valley, it even snows there in winter! There’s a number of quaint shops all reflecting a time long gone. Our first stop was to the Grey Horse Cafe for a sandwich and a warming cup of tea. We sat outside by the War Memorial admiring the roses and feeling quite chilly.

Historic town of Walhalla N.S.W.
The historic town of Walhalla N.S.W

Just up the road outside the General Stores was a chap feeding the King parts and Crimson Rosella, both beautiful birds, which you can see. He told us that they rely on him …I bet they do!

King Parrots & Crimson Rosella
Feeding time for the King Parrots & Crimson Rosella

I loved the Victorian-style band stand dominating the village and made a note to walk up to to it on our way back from visiting the Gold Mine.

Band stand in Walhalla
Could it be anything other than a Band Stand?

The Long Tunnel Extended Mine conducts tours every day. You don’t need to book ahead and with the concession rate my man and I paid $15 each. Our guide was great and gave us lots of information and she aimed it so that everyone, whatever age, could get a lot out of this entertaining tour. For the history of the mine have a look at their website http://www.walhallaboard.org.au/long-tunnel-extended-gold-mine

Long Tunnel Extended Mine, Walhalla NSW
Long Tunnel Extended Mine

After the tour we had just enough time to walk back through the village to the railway station to catch the Walhalla Goldfields Railway. This is a narrow gauge railway, run by volunteers. It’s a great journey (far too wobbly to take any pictures) which runs through Stringers Creek Gorge, going over six large trestle bridges. Then it passes through the delightfully named ‘Happy Creek’ before arriving at Thomson station. The star of the show for us was Gladys, the volunteer who seemed to be very much in charge even down to waving the train off as we left on the return journey.

Walhalla Goldfields Railway NSW
Walhalla Goldfields Railway

At this point we still hadn’t gone to where we were staying the night although we’d seen the cottage as its perched on top of a steep bank overlooking the railway. Stringer’s Cottage is a one-bedroom miner’s cottage tucked away and shaded by a massive mountain ash and black wood trees. It’s compact, eco friendly, solar powered and is bursting with character, we loved it there.

Miners Cottage in Walhalla and the Cemetery
Stringers Cottage and Walhalla Cemetery

I’m sure by now you’re thinking that we couldn’t cram anymore into this day but we did. I have a thing about churchyards …anywhere, anytime. I was not going to miss a visit to Walhalla Cemetery which I knew would tell the harsh reality of life here faced by the miners and their families. It’s an unusual cemetery perched high above the town with apparently 1100 graves although only 200 can now be located which seems very sad. It’s quite tricky to get around, climbing up along the terraces and stone walls but we made it to the top and it was well worth it.

By the time we got back to Stringers Cottage we only had a short time to sort ourselves out ready for our meal at the only pub in town. In fact the only place in town you can eat in the evening and you have to make sure you’ve ordered by 7.00pm. The Walhalla Lodge Hotel, better known as The Wally Pub was just what we wanted. An excellent pint of beer and a huge plate of good, hearty food. Just what we needed!

By 9.30 we were heading back to our little cottage in the woods. It was really quiet. No cars, people or any activity apart from a few Crimson Rosellas in the trees. No surprise that we slept very well that night in our miners cottage.

Sydney Rocks!

It was great to arrive in Sydney in the early morning and know we could crash for a few hours in our airbnb apartment. Once again my man had chosen well. The apartment was in a quiet part of the city, Pott’s Point and had great views of the bay and over to Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House. I can’t say we did too much that day, we were still re-charging our batteries.

Sydney Harbour
Walking to a famous landmark.

This was day 2 and time to explore! We walked from Pott’s Point enjoying the fresh air and feeling excited to be in Sydney. We walked along the path by Woolloomooloo Bay (great name) up to the viewpoint at Mrs Macquarie’s Chair. These Ozzies know how to name places! By then there were quite a few tourists around as it’s a popular spot to take pictures. The sky looked quite threatening but for me that kind of backdrop makes for good pictures.

We carried on through the Royal Botanic Garden which is beautiful and huge …30 hectares if you can imagine that. You can easily spend a day wandering around there but we were on a mission to do as many sights as possible!

Australian birds in the Royal Botanical Garden Sydney.
One or two of the exotic birds we spotted in the Royal Botanical Garden.
The Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney
The Royal Botanic Garden.

We came out of the garden and joined the main path up to the Opera House. You kind-of pinch yourself – it’s so iconic. You’ve seen it in pictures etc and suddenly there it is in front of you. The design is incredible and even more so when you see it from the bay, it really does look like a ship on water!

Sydney Harbour
Walking to a famous landmark.
Front of the Sydney Opera House
Sydney Opera House, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

We went inside but decided not to pay for a guided tour and instead treated ourselves to a glass of fizz and a sandwich on the terrace. So glad we didn’t have a meal there as the seagulls are SO agressive and dive-bomb anyone eating food. The food on the plates is covered with a metal lid but you have to take it off to get at your food. Before the unsuspecting diners know what’s happening the seagulls are swooping down and grabbing it! To us it looked like a scene from ‘The Birds.’

Having enjoyed the free entertainment and managing to eat our sandwich we walked around as much of the outside of the building as you can and went to the loo inside without having to pay admission! Refreshed and ready to go again we took the path around Circular Quay walking towards an area of the city known as The Rocks.

The Rocks is definitely our favourite area of Sydney. It’s got character, open-air markets, lots of pubs and restaurants and a great atmosphere. The streets were teeming with people but I managed to spot a French bakery shop as we walked along towards the bridge; that’ll do I thought for after we’ve climbed up the bridge. I should say that we did the Pylon Lookout and not the walk across the whole span of the bridge. I’m sure that’s great but it’s not cheap and would have taken a huge chunk of time out of our day. To go up the 200 stairs to the south-east pylon lookout is only $10 dollars (concession rate) and you still get a great view. The exhibitions are interesting too with some fabulous pictures showing the men constructing the bridge. They had some guts to do that and amazingly only sixteen men died and only two actually fell to their deaths from the bridge.

A view from the south east pylon of the Sydney Harbour Bridge
Views from the south east pylon of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

I’ve found the name of the French cake shop …very happy to give ‘La Renaissance’ a mention, the cakes were delicious. Suitably refreshed, we walked all the way back to our apartment. We’d certainly discovered a good part of Sydney and covered a few miles that day.

Day 3 and we had a wander around the city centre. Pretty much like any other but I did like this arcade, The Strand Arcade.

Strand Arcade in Sydney city centre.
Strand Arcade in the city centre.

Gosh it was chilly walking round and there was us thinking Sydney would be steaming! Fortunately we’d planned to go on the ferry across to Manly and over there, the sun was shining. It feels like you’re going across to an island but it’s boringly described by Wikipedia as a beach-side suburb of northern Sydney.

Manly Island NSW
Manly island.

We weren’t too impressed walking down to the seafront. Lot of shops that you find anywhere at seaside places …reminded us of Mablethorpe High Street without the motorised wheelchairs! Fortunately once we’d got away from that area and started walking the coastal path things looked up, so much so I almost missed seeing this water dragon. There were signs for them but I didn’t expect to spot one. They are quite impressive especially the way they blend in with the rocks. We didn’t get too close, (I used my long lens), they have serious claws and bite!

Water dragons of Sydney
Australian water dragon

After a fantastic fish lunch at a seafood cafe washed down with an excellent glass of Aussie wine we decided to do some exploring. It was funny to see this sign in the middle of a suburban area and yes, once we were back on the wooded trail we actually saw a bandicoot. Only for a second though, nervous critters clearly.

Sign for Bandicoots. NSW Australia
We just don’t get these at home …

By the time we got back to the ferry we’d probably walked six or seven miles. Ten out of ten for wildlife, the same for the beaches we came across and the terrain inland. Heavens knows how we came to stumble across a parade ground and barracks with no-one around or walk through a suburb of Manly but these things happen sometimes on our walks. We couldn’t help noticing on our way back to Sydney that the sky was overcast and the temperature when we got off the ferry was ten degrees colder than in Manly! Apparently it had been like that all afternoon in the city.

That night I took a final picture looking across from our apartment to the Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge. It looked great with all the lights twinkling. Tomorrow we would be heading south in a hire car down Australia’s Pacific Coast.

Landmarks of Sydney at night
View from our apartment on our last night in Sydney.

Two days in Singapore.

Supertree Grove, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore

A stop-over in Singapore (1)

We were off to Australia, our first trip to the Antipodes. We could have flown straight to Sydney but it was just too tempting to stop-over in Singapore after all, we’d arrive in Oz more alert without jet lag …wouldn’t we?

It was about ten years since we’d been in Singapore. Even at 6am and you’ve guessed it, feeling pretty zonked as we were driven from the airport, the skyline of the city looked impressive. Was it our imagination or did it seem like skyscraper city, with the ocassional area of green grass? How much would we recognise from the last time we were here we wondered, a lot can change in ten years.

We knew we wouldn’t be able to get into our room until early afternoon so after dumping our cases at our hotel, The Park Regis, we made our way into town, dragging our feet with tiredness. It was a grey old day which didn’t help to lift our spirits although it’s an interesting walk around the Boat Quay. Afterwards we looked around the very impressive National Gallery which is free to go in and huge. After a cheap and delicious Chinese lunch in one of the back streets we were able to get into our room and catch up on some sleep.

The boat quay, Singapore.
The boat quay, Singapore.
The statues along the Boat Quay, Singapore
Superb sculptures alongside the Boat Quay

A few hours later and we were ready to hit the city. We headed off to Gardens by the Bay which is a huge, futuristic park in the bay area. It’s rated one of the top three things to do in Singapore and you can see why. Great place and it’s free!

Supertree Grove, Singapore during the Light & Sound show.
Skyway and Supertree Grove. Taken during the Light and Sound show.

So much to see in the park and the Light and Sound show which takes place every evening at 7.45 and 8.45 is spectacular. How they’ve lit up the trees is something else – an amazing sight. Huge crowds started to gather to enjoy this free show; you have find to a space to sit wherever you can. If you want you can pay to watch it from the Skyway but we didn’t see the point. We did agree though that when we come back to the city in a couple of week’s time we’ll go up to the top of the Marina Bay Sands hotel and watch the display from there.

Our flight the next day wasn’t until early evening so we spent the day walking around the city, our first stop was the Asian Civilisations Museum. We love anything to do with Asian artefacts and culture. The gallery is on three levels and showcases not just Asian art and culture but also sculptures and paintings of Christian and Islamic art. As it turned out we could have spent hours in there, so much to see, it was excellent. I took a few pictures but the light in several of the galleries was very low. Their website has some good pictures on there.

Display from the Tang shipwreck
Display from the Tang shipwreck of more than 1000 pieces from the 9th century of ceramics, gold and silver.
The Gallery of ancient religions at The Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore
The Gallery of ancient religions.
Asian Museum, Singapore
The variety of exhibits in the Museum, something for everyone.

Inevitably when you’re staying in Singapore the place to go and explore and enjoy a good value meal is Chinatown. Apart from the appalling smell as you pass the stalls selling durian fruit, the area is fun, colourful and bursting with life. Night time is best to experience the buzz, the smell of street food and enjoy the entertainment. We ate there both nights

On our second night before going for a meal we visited the Hindu temple, Sri Mariamann which is just around the corner from Chinatown. I don’t know why but invariably on holiday I come across a wedding and this holiday was no exception. We didn’t expect the temple to be full of people carrying food, a procession and loud music. We weren’t sure what was going on but it turned out to be the first of several ceremonies celebrating a wedding. Don’t know whether the bride and groom were there but there was plenty going on even if they weren’t! We couldn’t stay too long as we wanted to have a meal before heading off to the airport. Only wish my pictures conveyed the huge amount of activity going on at this temple and the deafening noise!

A ceremony at Sri Mariamman Temple
The start of the ceremony at Sri Mariamman Temple
Food at the wedding ceremony at Sri Mariamman Temple, Singapore
Announcements at the beginning of the wedding ceremony at Sri Mariamman Temple
Wonderful features of the Sri Mariamman Temple, Singapore
Some of the wonderful features of the Sri Mariamman Temple, Singapore

After another excellent meal in Chinatown washed down by a couple of bottles of Tiger beer we picked up our bags from the hotel and headed for the airport for our next part of the trip. Australia here we come!

The wonders of Winchester

February is not my favourite time of the year so I love to break it up with a couple of days away. Having said that, unlike last year, this February has been pretty good. There were days here in The Cotswolds when the temperature reached 19 degrees and even warmer in some parts of the UK.

We had decided to go to Winchester for our break as it’s an interesting city and it was quite a few years since we’d been there. My man had done his usual research and booked a ‘Fullers’ pub right in the heart of the city near to the Cathedral. The Wykeham Arms was a great choice; a pub full of character, good beer and our spacious room was excellent. Good rates too.

After checking in, our first stop was to walk up to the small church of St Swithun’s. This church is tiny and sits above the Kingsgate arch just outside the cathedral grounds. You could easily miss it as the only access is by a narrow staircase at the side. The church dates back to the 13th century and has whitewashed walls and a timber roof. Only a very few of these ‘gateway’ churches’ remain. It’s definitely worth a visit.

Sights of Winchester, Hants.
The pub, the arches alongside the cathedral and the interior of St Swithun’s Church.

Cathedral Close, Winchester.
Cathedral Close

Winchester Cathedral is one of the largest cathedrals in the country and is one of my favourites. It’s architecture is stunning especially the enormous Gothic nave and atmospheric crypt with its statue by Anthony Gormley entitled Sound II. There’s a modest admission charge and nothing extra to take photographs. It’s a brilliant place in which to just ‘snap away’! Here below is a selection.

Architectural highlights of Winchester Cathedral
South Transept, the nave and (bottom right), view of the High Altar from the lectern.
Architectural highlights of Winchester Cathedral
Altar and in the background one of the famous Chantry Chapels
Architectural highlights of Winchester Cathedral
The 14th century choir stalls and The 15th century Great Screen.
Architectural highlights of Winchester Cathedral
The nave with its fan vaulted ceiling and bottom right the exit door and medieval stained glass window.
Crypt in Winchester cathedral and Anthony Gormley's statue
‘Sound II’ sculpture by Anthony Gormley made from lead out of plaster cast of the sculpture’s own body. The crypt floods when there’s been lots of rain.

After spending a very pleasant hour or so we had lunch in the Cathedral Refectory. A good range of food but quite a wait for two toasted sandwiches!

Just by the visitors’ centre is a statue (technically a bust) of the famous diver, William Walker. He is credited with saving the Cathedral from sinking by underpinning the foundations. It’s a fascinating story which is told in panels in the cathedral complete with pictures. From 1906-1911 he dived down into the waters to a depth of up to six meters in complete darkness to excavate the mud and sludge so that afterwards the area could be filled in with concrete. His heavy diving suit was made of metal and was too cumbersome to take off so when he came up to eat his sandwiches at lunchtime he just removed his helmet. It enabled him to eat and enjoy his pipe afterwards which he was convinced would protect him from any germs in the water. Sadly William died in the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic.

William Walker, famous diver, who saved Winchester Cathedral
William Walker, famous diver.

After lunch we walked along the river to the Hospital of St Cross. Founded in the 1130’s this Hospital is one of the oldest Almshouses in England. It’s purpose was to provide help for gentry who had fallen on hard times. Today the Almshouses are home to 25 Brothers who to this day still wear burgundy gowns for their daily Matins.

Walk to St Cross, Wilts by the river.
Walking along the river to St Cross
Grounds of the Hospital of St Cross, Wiltshire.
Grounds of St Cross

It’s an impressive place with a large church, Brethens’ Hall, Kitchens and the interesting and peaceful Master’s Garden. There were only a few other visitors which meant that I had a ‘clear run’ taking pictures.

Inside Brethren's Hall St Cross, Winchester
Inside Brethren’s Hall
St Cross Church, Winchester
St Cross Church
Master's Garden, St Cross, Winchester
Master’s Garden

It’s only a short walk from there back to the city centre but we felt we deserved a pint of ‘London Pride’ when we got back to the pub. If only we had beer like that in our local …

We rounded off our day with a Thai meal which wasn’t memorable but walking through Cathedral close was. The evening light on the Cathedral was fantastic. A friend of ours described it as a ‘Golden House’ and he was right. A perfect end to our stay in this lovely city.

Evening sunlight on Winchester cathedral, Wilts
Evening sunlight.

A quick visit to France

sun setting over the sea at Le Touquet, Northern France.
Setting sun over the sea at Le Touquet

It was just a co-incidence that we’d chosen to stay overnight at Montreuil-sur-Mer after stocking up on life’s essentials at the Hypermarket at Cite d’Europe.

Montreuil was a source of inspiration for Victor Hugo who wrote the novel ‘Les Miserables’. It’s recently been televised by the BBC and so several of our friends were asking whether this was the reason we’d chosen to stay there … it wasn’t. We thought that instead of going straight home after our mammoth shop it would be a nice idea to stay somewhere not too far away from Calais. Montreuil is only an hour down the motorway and it turned out to be a very good choice.

On the way there we came off the motorway at Le Touquet as I wanted to take a picture of the sun setting over the sea. I’m glad we did because as you can see from the shot above, it was a beautiful sight.

Having arrived at our hotel we got a bit of a shock as we tried the door to the old building which was locked and then realised the place was empty apart from a cement mixer! Major refurbishments are going on so we were relieved when a workman directed us next door to the open part of the hotel. We’d definitely recommend Les Hauts de Montreuil. We were given a nice warm welcome, the bedroom was huge and the meal in the evening was excellent and if that wasn’t enough the choice at breakfast was amazing – everything you could imagine include home-made creme- caramel!

Hotel Les Hauts de Montreuil-sur-mer. France
Hotel Les Hauts de Montreuil

It was late afternoon when we arrived so we just had time before it got dark to wander up to the ramparts. Apparently there’s 3km of them so Montreuil was pretty much a fortress and still is. The street, Clape-en-Bas with it’s old houses built of mud is very picturesque but as the light wasn’t good I waited until the next day to photograph it.

Streets in Montreuil-sur-mer, Pas-de-Calais region
Streets in Montreuil-sur-mer (near the ramparts)

The following day was bitterly cold and very grey with a promise of snow later. Nevertheless we had a good walk round the town. I took a few pictures of Rue Clape-en-Bas and then we walked up to ‘The Citadel’ which was built on the site of a former royal castle. Just shows how important a place Montreuil was. Every summer the town puts on a ‘Son et lumiere’ show in the Citadel celebrating Victor Hugo’s ‘Les Miserables’

The Citadel in Montreuil-sur-mer
The Citadel, an ancient monument and two views of the Ramparts.

After walking round a section of the ramparts we ended our walk round by popping into the main church. I thought it was a rather austere building on the outside although the carvings around the door are interesting. The church dominates one of the town’s large squares (lots of free parking!) and dates back to the 13th century when it was a monastery. The fan-vaulted ceiling is impressive as is the altar, the stained glass windows and the medieval tombs. Definitely worth a visit.

Church of Saint-Saulve, Montreuil, France
Church Saint-Saulve, Montreuil

This really had been a short trip to France but we’d packed quite a bit in and had a full boot of wine to show for it and a few other goodies too …and we beat the snow that fell on Montreuil that evening.

And onto Palma …

Our first trip to the island of Mallorca and we couldn’t miss out on going to Palma. I knew there was an impressive cathedral in the capital and an historic palace but I was surprised with the number of stunning Art Deco buildings … I love this style. I also cursed that I hadn’t brought a larger suitcase as there were lots of nice shops along the narrow streets but maybe it was just as well!

The streets of Palma, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
Just a few of the interesting things I spotted as we wandered around.

We thought the streets were pretty busy but we were told by one of the shopkeepers that it was fairly quiet as there were no large cruise ships in the harbour that day. She complained that the tourists don’t bring much trade to the city as they buy their souvenirs on board and stuff themselves so full of food they don’t eat in the local restaurants. The ice-cream sellers apparently do well though.

Royal Palace of Almudaina, Palma, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
Royal Palace of Almudaina, historic palace of the Royal Family
The harbourside, Palma, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
The harbourside

The Royal Palace is right by the waterfront as is the massive Cathedral which is adjacent. If you arrive by boat the Cathedral and Palace must look even more impressive as they rise above the city.

Santa Maria Cathedral, Palma, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
The massive Santa Maria Cathedral dating from the 13th century.

Inside the Cathedral is pretty impressive too. We had to queue about fifteen minutes to get inside in what must be the windiest street in Palma! The wait and the wind whipping round was worth it, the interior is beautiful even though jostling with lots of other tourists was a bit of a pain.

Santa Maria Cathedral, Palma, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
Santa Maria Cathedral, Palma, Mallorca

It was a great to escape from the crowds as we slowly meandered back to the bus station. The weather was changing and we were beginning to feel the cold so we stopped and had a warm drink. Just opposite the cafe was a church. Nothing elaborate from the outside although clearly very old. Ironically this little church had much more atmosphere than we’d felt in the cathedral. Maybe it was because there was just two of us in there. Sadly I don’t know the name of the church but the picture below shows the incredibly ornate altar which dominated the tiny nave.

Tiny church altar-piece. Palma, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
The elaborate altar in this tiny church in Palma.

The weather on the last two days of our holiday was definitely on the change. Bright skies one minute then showers and a very keen wind most of the time. Makes for great seascapes although walking along the seafront was quite a challenge.

Wild seas on the west coast of Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
Wild seas whipping the west coast.

Waking up on our final morning to sunshine we decided to go over to Bunyola in the foothills of the Tramuntana Mountains to visit the Jardines de Alfabia.

The entrance is impressive with an avenue of palm trees and at the top there’s an interesting ‘keyhole’ where you can look through to a still pond of crystal-clear water. The pergola further along was great too as you just have to push a button and watch small fountains of water criss-cross the path. Children would love this, particularly if any unsuspecting visitors are walking through the pergola at the time!

Interesting features in the Jardines de Alfabia, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
View through the ‘keyhole’ and the Romanesque pergola.
Jardines de Alfabia, Bunyola, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
Jardines de Alfabia, Bunyola and historical house. A great place to enjoy a glass of wine among the shady palm trees.

As I wrote in the first part of my Blog on Mallorca, we were very pleased we’d chosen Puigpunyent as our base. We ate out several times in the town and enjoyed all the meals. The Rose Restaurant run by a Dutch couple was excellent and is very popular with tourists. The Bar Ca’n Jordi is more basic with very reasonable prices, good food and friendly staff. Sitting outside by the town square is a perfect place to enjoy a beer or a glass of the local wine. It’s a popular spot for cyclists to pause and have a drink before tacking the gruelling climb up the mountains. The family-run Ca Sa Nina restaurant at the edge of the town was our favourite. As well as the excellent local wine, the fish was superb as was the steak that John had (on both visits) and the staff were great too.

I can’t finish this without mentioning the micro brewery in the town. Cas Cerveser has only been going a couple of years but has already made its mark on the island and beyond. And no wonder, the beer is great! The good news is that the brewery opens its doors every Friday evening. Beer straight from the barrels. No need to cook either …a pizza van arrives and parks opposite the brewery serving delicious wood-fire pizzas. In addition they have a live band which adds to the fantastic friendly atmosphere. This is a real family evening with children running around the square while adults enjoy a pint or two. We only had a five minute walk back up to our apartment and slept very well after three pints of the Galilea golden ale! We felt very at home in the village. It’s a peaceful place but has lots to offer and has the added bonus of being off the tourist trail.

Cas Cerveser Brewery in Puigpunyent
Cas Cerveser Brewery in Puigpunyent

A trip to Mallorca

View over Puigpunyent, Mallorca

Hoping to grab some autumn sunshine and warm weather we decided to head for Mallorca (Majorca). My man had done his usual research and found a studio apartment in the small town of Puigpunyent just twenty minutes drive from Palma. It was perfect, very quiet, newly constructed with stunning views of the Tramuntana mountains.

Beautiful views of Tramuntana mountain range
Secluded terrace with beautiful views of the Tramuntana mountain range.

This is a hilly island with a great coastline. Plenty of beaches away from the popular tourist spots and lots of great walks to do. Don’t make the mistake that I did by thinking my little dinky trainers would be fine …they weren’t. I should have sacrificed some space in my case and taken my walking boots, it was a lesson learnt!

Coastal walk from Banyalbufar to Port des Canonge, Mallorca
Old smugglers route from Banyalbufar to Port des Canonge

The coastal hike from from Banyalbufar to Port des Canonge is a popular one. Even in October the car park at the starting point was full but eventually we found somewhere. The hike takes you through pine forest along high rocky crags and after 6km down to the beach to the small port. I’m grateful to the cafe owner for giving me iodine and a dressing for my knee. I was much more careful about where I walked on the way back! It’s a stunning walk but make sure you wear appropriate footwear.

100 year old narrow gauge railway from Palma to Soller in Mallorca and the old tram to Soller Port
100-year old narrow gauge railway from Palma to Soller and the old tram to the Port

Most tourists visiting Mallorca go on this little train, so we did too! Good bus service from Puigpunyent to Palma and cheap too. We found the terminus with minutes to spare and sat back enjoying the 50-minute journey to Soller. No time to look round as the next stage of the trip is to take the old tram so you join the queue with the rest of the tourists. The trams wind their way through Soller before going along the coast a short distance to the port.

Sollar port, Mallorca with old tram by Maggie Booth Photography
Sollar port.

Even at this time of year Sollar Port was heaving. Beautiful weather as you can see. We weren’t too bothered about eating in one the many restaurants along the harbour front or tempted by the souvenir shops so after a short walk and a beer we got the tram back to Sollar. We had an inexpensive lunch in a sandwich shop away from the main square with entertainment provided by the owner who was quite a character. The Japanese tourists just couldn’t work him out!

Near Saint Elm in Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
A quiet beach just by Saint Elm.

With the weather still holding we headed the next day for the coast to the small seaside town of Saint Elm. This place is beautiful! We had been tipped off that if we walked down from the town a little way we would find a quiet little beach and we did. Five people including us, it was perfect, as indeed was the lunch we had later back in the town.

The 18th century monastery in Valdemossa and and the gardens The Palace of King Sancho by Maggie Booth Photography
The 18th century monastery in Valdemossa and the gardens of The Palace of King Sancho.
Inside the monastery at Valldemossa, Mallorca with the old monastic pharmacy by Maggie Both Photography
Inside the monastery with the old monastic pharmacy
A decorative tile on a house in Valldemossa, Mallorca by Maggie Booth Photography
One of the decorative tiles on a house in Valldemossa

The guide book on Mallorca says that Valldemossa is the destination of thousands of visitors every year. You can see why it’s so popular. The winding roads up to this mountain village are interesting to say the least and the town is very cute. There are flowers everywhere, decorative tiles on the houses and some great shops! You have to visit the 18th century monastery which includes the pharmacy used by the monks. We didn’t pay extra to go into the rooms used by the composer Chopin. The guides want you to, but we are a bit too shrewd to fall for that. The Palace is interesting too and is included in your ticket.

I think this Blog is quite long enough! Part two on our trip to Mallorca will follow shortly …